Joshua Sperling, Patricia Romero-lankao, & Daniel Runfola, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, USA


Presentation Title: Exploring health outcomes, inconveniences, and perceived risks associated with infrastructure, pollution and extreme weather events in Mumbai, India

 

Summary

This presentation shared findings on health outcomes, inconveniences and perceived risks that may be associated with infrastructure provisions, air pollution, or climate-related extreme weather events by residents in different neighborhoods of Mumbai, India. National survey data and analyses of over 1,200 household surveys conducted with international partners were utilized to help explore how households of varying socio-economic conditions within different areas experience different illnesses and inconveniences. Household perceptions of risk across these areas were also compared as part of analyses on local policy priorities regarding most important changes to improving health and well-being. The results presented demonstrate high levels of household interest in improved infrastructure conditions over pollution or extreme weather events, yet less than 50% of residents also view local action on health risks related to pollution and extreme weather events as also important. Finally, geospatial analyses of household surveys helped visualize the opportunities for integrating activities within socio-institutional and built environment systems for improving health, infrastructure provisions and reducing environment- and climate-related risks across different Mumbai neighborhoods.

Key Lessons Learned

Less than 50% of surveyed households (n=1258) view city action on climate change, pollution and extreme weather as important, yet those lacking basic infrastructure provisions will prioritize that first over other perceived environmental risks.

Policy/Practice Implications of Research

The differences in local conditions within a city are significant and often interconnected with risk perceptions, priorities for development and capacities to manage risks. The results demonstrate how city goals may range from reducing pollution and managing extreme weather to providing access to high quality infrastructures and services, yet with more emphasis needed on participatory and evidence-based processes for how cities can prioritize actions within and across the city and its’ diverse neighborhoods.

Knowledge Gaps and Needs

  • Additional research in cities that integrates health outcomes data with household experiences in response to hazards and perceived risks of future hazards by location can help inform how households with varying local conditions within city neighborhoods experience different health risks, inconveniences, and capacities to manage risks related to infrastructure, pollution and extreme weather events.
     
  • Future research methods that increasingly utilize simple SMS cellphone technology to provide real-time data that integrates with geospatial analyses of household surveys can help visualize key opportunities for integrating activities within socio-institutional and built environment systems for improving health, infrastructure, and reducing environment- and climate-related risks within and across cities.
     
  • A better understanding of disease burdens related to socio-economics, including data on access to healthcare and mortality data that includes causes of death, given that many deaths are not reported in developing country cities.

 

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